Tag Archive for dog

Save Money on Flea Treatment

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save money on flea treatmentDid you know you can save money on flea treatment for your cats and small dogs by purchasing the largest size package of Advantage II (Extra Large Dog – over 55 lbs.) or Frontline Plus (89-132 lbs.) for dogs and using a portion of a tube at a time? You can also use plain Advantage and Frontline the same way but these products do not contain the second ingredient that the II and Plus versions have which is a growth regulator and I cannot stress how important this is in avoiding a flea infestation.

The plain versions of these products kill adult fleas but do not stop the eggs that fall to the floor or furniture from hatching and becoming adult, biting fleas. Yes, once back on your pet the adults die, but that doesn’t stop the cycle and an adult flea can lay up to 50 eggs per day! That’s where the growth regulator comes in. It interferes with the normal growth cycle of the fleas and prevents them from becoming mature adults.

The drugs in Advantage II for Dogs and Advantage II for Cats are exactly the same drugs (Imidacloprid 9.1% and Pyriproxyfen 0.46%) at the exact same concentrations. 

Advantage II Application Guidelines:
Cats up to 9 pounds – 0.4ml

Cats 10+ pounds – 0.8ml
Dogs 11-20 pounds – 1.0ml
Dogs 21-55 pounds – 2.5ml
Dogs 55+ pounds – 4.0ml

Frontline Plus for cats contains 9.8% fipronil and 11.8% (S)-methoprene (and 78.4% inert ingredients). Frontline Plus for dogs contains 9.8% fipronil and 8.8% (S)-methoprene (and 81.4% inert ingredients). The amount of growth regulator in the dog version is LESS than in the cat version so certainly should be safe for your cat. Don’t use the cat version on your dog.

Frontline Application Guidelines:
Cats 0.5ml

Dogs 11-22 pounds – 0.67ml
Dogs 23-44 pounds – 1.34ml
Dogs 45-88 pounds – 2.68ml
Dogs 89-132 pounds – 4.0ml

Here’s How to Save Money on Flea TreatmentSave money on flea treatment. What to use and how much. Photo of bottle, syringe and flea medication.

Using the dog versions of Advantage and Frontline on cats is nothing new. You will find uninformed people on the internet saying don’t do it, but shelters and rescues have been doing it for years. That doesn’t in and of itself make it right, but it is vet approved, including by my vet.

I have found the easiest way to portion out the product if you are treating multiple animals is to empty a tube into a small (1/2 oz.) bottle with a dropper tip. You can cut off the tip to accommodate a syringe and draw up the proper amount. I prefer to draw it out this way rather than wasting what sticks to the outside of the syringe if you just stick it down into the bottle. You can then just squeeze out the syringe onto your pet. I highly recommend using a syringe for accurate measurement–this is not something you want to eyeball!

A second method, especially if you are treating only one or two pets, is to use a syringe with a needle and draw what you need directly from the tube. Remove the needle and apply to your pet.

Please note: The above information is for Advantage and Frontline only. Veterinarians and drug manufacturers warn against tube splitting and doing so may void their liability. Some dog-only products, such as Advantix, can kill a cat. Do your own research and if you decide to split tubes be sure to:

  • Handle safely – wash your hands thoroughly after use
  • Store properly – in a cool, dark place
  • Use the appropriate dose

Advantage II Extra Large Dog 6-Pack (Misc.)


List Price: $79.27 USD
New From: $61.30 USD In Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

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Be Kind to Animals Week

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Be Kind to Animals Week, May 4-10, 2014

The American Humane Association created Be Kind to Animals Week in 1915 to encourage compassion toward animals. Every year, animal shelters throughout the country hold special events during this time-honored week to raise awareness about animals in our homes and communities and to celebrate the unique bond between humans and animals.

For those tempted to comment that this should be every day, of course, we agree. Commemorative days or weeks for an occasion are intended to bring special awareness and to celebrate, not to suggest that the activity should be done only on that day or during that week. And though you might be kind to animals, there are so many out there still suffering at the hands of people who are not. So, take a look at the other ways to celebrate below and see how you can help spread the word.

Be Kind to Animals Week

Other ways to celebrate from The American Humane Association

  • Report any suspected animal abuse or neglect to animal control
  • Commit to adopting your next pet from an animal shelter
  • Donate to or volunteer at your local animal shelter
  • Spay or neuter your pets and encourage friends and family to do the same
  • Spend quality time with your pet
  • Make sure your pet has an ID tag or microchip
  • Drive cautiously through areas populated by wild animals such as deer
  • Plant flowers in your yard that will attract butterflies or hummingbirds
  • Speak out in your community about the importance of respecting animals

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National Preparedness Month

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Are you prepared for an emergency? In a Citizen Corps National Survey taken in September is National Preparedness Month2009, less than 50% of Americans surveyed reported having a household emergency plan. This month is the 10th annual National Preparedness Month, sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the US Department of Homeland Security. September was chosen as National Preparedness Month, as the tragedies of September 11th, 2001 highlighted to the nation the importance of being prepared.

Disaster can strike at any time without warning but you can take simple steps to prepare for emergencies in your home. FEMA has identified four major steps to being prepared:

  1. Be informed
  2. Make a plan
  3. Build a kit
  4. Get involved

Building a Kit

Remember Your Pets in Your Plan

Make a plan that includes your pets during National Preparedness MonthWhen you are making your plan and building your kit, remember to include your pets. Leaving them behind in a disaster puts them and others at risk. 

Having proper identification on your pet is important every day but essential in a disaster. You may have a carrier to take pets to the vet or groomer but do you have one for each pet? Be sure each crate has identification on it. Familiarize your pets with the crates before they are needed. Know where you will go when you evacuate. Pets may not be allowed in human shelters so know where pet friendly hotels are or make arrangements to stay with a friend or relative outside of the disaster area.

Disaster Supplies for Pets

  • Food (in airtight waterproof containers or cans) and water for at Cats in cratesleast 2 weeks for each pet
  • Food and water bowls and a manual can opener
  • For cats: litter box and litter
  • For dogs: plastic bags for poop
  • Clean-up items for bathroom accidents (paper towels, plastic trash bags, bleach-containing cleaning agent)
  • Medications for at least 2 weeks, along with any treats used to give the medications and pharmacy contact for refills
  • Medical records
    • Rabies vaccination certificate
    • Current vaccination record
    • If your pet has a microchip, a record of the microchip number
    • Prescription for medication(s)
    • For cats, most recent FeLV/FIV test result or vaccination date
    • Summary of pertinent medical history; ask your veterinarian for a copy
  • Sturdy leashes or harnesses
  • Carrier or cage that is large enough for your pet to stand comfortably and turn around; towels or blankets
  • Pet toys and bed (familiar items to help the pet[s] feel more comfortable).
  • A handout containing identification Adobe PDF file information (in the event you get separated from your pet)
    • Current photo of pet
    • Pet’s descriptive features (age, sex, neutered/non-neutered status, color(s), and approximate weight)
    • Microchip number
    • Owner contact information (cell phone, work phone, home phone)
    • Contact information of a close relative or friend,
  • A handout with boarding instructions, Adobe PDF file such as feeding schedule, medications, and any known allergies and behavior problems
  • Documents, medications, and food should be stored in waterproof containers

More Information for Pet Owners


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Wordless Wednesday: Babies and Big Dogs

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Babies and Big Dogs

Babies and Big Dogs


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Wordless Wednesday: Shortcake & Jack

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 What do you think Shortcake is saying to Jack?

Our friends Shortcake and Jack who live in Plymouth, CA

Our friends Shortcake and Jack who live in Plymouth, CA


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Wordless Wednesday: Comfortable?

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Can this really be comfortable?

Asia angles

 


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National Dog Day – Animal Miracle Network – Colleen Paige

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National Dog Day 2013

National Dog Day is celebrated August 26th annually and serves to help galvanize the public to recognize the number of dogs that need to be rescued each year, and acknowledges family dogs and dogs that work selflessly each day to save lives, keep us safe and bring comfort. Dogs put their lives on the line every day – for their law enforcement partner, for their blind companion, for a child who is disabled, for our freedom and safety by detecting bombs and drugs and pulling victims of tragedy from wreckage.

Founded in 2004 by pet lifestyle expert and author Colleen Paige, National Dog Day was created to honor dogs more than we currently do, to give them “a day”, to show deep appreciation for our long connection to each other – for their endearing patience, unquestioning loyalty, for their work, their capacity for love and their ability to impact our lives everyday in the most miraculous ways. National Dog Day wishes to encourage dog ownership of all breeds, mixed and pure – and embraces the opportunity for all dogs to live a happy, safe and ”abuse-free life”.

National Dog Day is against any kind of “breed ban”. Dogs should not have to lose their lives because of the atrocities they have been forced to endure at the hands of man. And while we feel that American’s have the constitutional right to purchase a pure breed dog, we strongly discourage buying from pet stores, backyard breeders, the internet, newspaper ads and puppy mills, and rather encourage those seeking new canine companions, to verify that they are buying from a reputable breeder, educate themselves about their dog’s breed and better yet – visit their local shelter or pure breed rescue group to adopt a new furry family member that will be forever grateful. Millions of dogs are euthanized each year because they are unwanted. They are wonderful and viable sentient beings that deserve compassion and respect. Please consider adopting on National Day!

National Dog Day will also be many a dog’s birthday and for all of them it will be akin to a “K9- 4th of July!” Even citizens who are not dog owners will be encouraged to donate $5 to their local shelter on National Dog Day. 

via National Dog Day – Animal Miracle Network – Colleen Paige.


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Pet Doors

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Over the years I have spent a small fortune on pet doors. Many shapes, sizes and brands have come through my home. This article is based on my personal experience and opinion of the several I have owned.

First of all let’s talk about whether you would or should have a pet door. There are many situations where a pet door can be convenient but, as with everything else as a pet owner, you must be responsible with your pet and what your pet does. For example, a dog that tends to go out and bark in the middle of the night may need to be locked in at night or you will have angry neighbors.

I had a friend who lived in an apartment with two cats and two roommates. The cat box was in the shower of the downstairs bathroom. She wanted her cat to sleep with her in her room but, with roommates, felt uncomfortable leaving her door open at night. This meant having to get up to let the cat out to use the box in the middle of the night and then again when he wanted back in. Her solution? She went to the local home improvement store and purchased another door. She had her dad install a cat flap into the door and install the door into her apartment. Problem solved and the cat really liked the fact that he had access to the room any time. When she moved, she simply put the original door back and since the door fit her next place, she just did the same there too.

I started out with a simple flap door when I first lived with my mom in Whittier. It was mounted into the door in the back porch. I had a very busy nine-pound terrier mix. She was in and out all day long. The flap door worked great. Because she chased out any and all animals from the yard, I had no worries about leaving it open all the time. After she passed, I didn’t get another dog for many years.

Then I got Asia after moving to Walnut with my brother. She was just nine weeks old. After she got a little older, we installed a screen door flap allowing her into a fenced back yard. She just thought that was great. Problem was, she would hit that door at a full run and the screen just could not take that kind of use. Within a few weeks we had to remove it and re-screen the door. 

We then purchased a sliding door panel with a pet door built in. That worked great for many years with only one baby possum getting into the house. Then, one fateful night, Asia discovered why you should leave skunks alone. Oh yes, she got sprayed and proceeded to run through the house in a panic. My brother caught her quickly and bathed her in the traditional methods, but the smell was with us for several weeks. Unfortunately, there was not much that would have prevented the incident, but it was still worth having the door for her.

When it came time to replace that door, we decided to get our first electronic pet door. The first one we had was a regular flap door that had a locking mechanism that was triggered by a controller warn on the dogs collar. This worked fairly well for about six months. The door stopped unlocking, trapping her inside. My brother tried fixing it several times, but eventually we just left it in the open position and forgot about it. When that door wore out, we tried another brand that worked on the same principle. It worked for about the same amount of time and then eventually quit too. When I moved back in with my Mom just before my Dad passed away, she could use the old door that was in the back porch. Though it was small, she managed just fine. 

Now, when we moved to Northern California, into the mountains, that was a different story. Here we have squirrels, raccoons, possums, lots of skunks, deer, bears, and mountain lions. In fact I’m locking the dogs in at dusk right now Pet door 2because there was a mountain lion spotted across the street a few days ago. Here, I knew that if I were to install a pet door, it would have to be reliable. I got on line and started searching and found “High Tech Pet.”  They are based in Ventura, California. The door can be mounted into a door or wall. I picked the wall in my room next to an outlet for power.  This door works with a sonic collar, but where it differs from all other doors is, it’s not a flap. This door is a piece of bullet proof glass that opens like a guillotine, sliding up and down. Even better, you can get parts fairly reasonably. I have had it installed for a year and a half, and though I have had to replace collars, the door works great. I have just received a new speaker harness to replace inside the door. It lets the dogs out, but not back in. The wiring harness was quite easy to replace too. The initial cost of the door was a chunk, but for me and where I live, it is imperative that only my animals are allowed access.

Pet door 1

Pet door 3

All in all, I would recommend a pet door to anyone who has a safe place for their pet to get out to.

CAT Door SALE – Electronic Cat Doors, Selective Entry Cat Doors, & Cat Flaps. Low Prices & Free Shipping!


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7 Things You Can Do to Stop Garbage Scavenging Dogs

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garbage scavenging dogReturning home to find that the family dog has found its way to the nearby trash can can be both frustrating and unnerving. This undesirable dog behavior creates unwanted messes that can be a tremendous source of irritation to the dog owner. Additionally, the behavior poses a threat to the dog who could ingest food that has gone bad or choke on something not intended for consumption. Fortunately, this age old problem comes with solutions that can be quickly and easily implemented to ensure that the garbage remains where it belongs — in the trash can!

Steps You Can Take to Stop Garbage Scavenging Dogs

Of course, the younger the dog, the easier it is to stop this. But here are a few ideas that may help with garbage scavenging dogs…

Drop several coins into a soda can. Seal the top of the can with duct tape.garbage scavenging dog When the dog approaches the trash can, shake the can aggressively at the dog. The unpleasant sound will keep it away. For the puppy, it becomes a scary place to avoid.

Place an indoor pet training mat in front of the trash can. When the dog steps on the mat it releases a harmless, but unpleasant static shock that will create an aversion to approaching the trash can. In the past, the safety and humanity of electronic devices has been questioned. However, present day electronic devices have made great strides in becoming a safe and effective means of dog training.

garbage savaging dogPurchase a trash can that locks shut. There are several companies that design locking trash cans with the purpose of keeping garbage securely in the trash can.

Install a snapping device, which is similar to a mouse trap except it has a large plastic flap that will keep the dog safe from harm. When the dog begins rummaging through the trash can, the device will snap shut. The dog will be frightened and reluctant to return to the trash can.

For indoors, you can spray some of your perfume on the can. I have heard that this can actually work.

You can also put some of that bitter apple spray on the outside, where he might touch it, if he still tried to get into it. Bitter apple is safe. You can get it at the pet store. It’s really most useful to stop chewing, but you might even set up a trap for him, with your current trash can, and put the bitter apple on some things in the top of the can. See if he is put off from the bitter apple.

Febreze makes a carpet spray that is supposed to get rid of pet odors. For some reason some dogs HATE the smell of it.


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DIETER, My Rescue Dog

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Dieter, my standard schnauzer, has never seen a shelter that I know of. He is a rescue dog none-the-less. He is lucky that the police did not shoot him. Let me tell you his story.

Asia, Shiba Inu

Asia

I have had Asia, my Shiba Inu, since she was seven weeks old. She is now 12 and starting to move a little slower. I have wanted a second dog for quite some time and have been looking at several breed types.

I got a call from my cousin, Jody, who knew I was looking for another dog. She said that her friend down the street found a schnauzer. They really liked the dog but had too many dogs to keep him. We made arrangements to meet and I went to her house the next day. She started by telling me his scary story. 

Rescue Dog’s Scary Story

Dieter - rescue dog

Dieter

Her husband is a truck driver for Safeway during the week. He and a couple of other coworkers rent a house where they stay during the week, going home on the weekends. One night, around 2 am, they heard a lot of barking outside. Figuring it was just coyotes, he went outside and shot off a couple of shotgun rounds into the air. The barking stopped and he went back to bed.

The next morning, when he walked out of the house, he found this raggedy dog stuck under his truck on some tape he could see wrapped around his body. He then noticed that in the tape was a black box looking much like a bomb. My friend immediately called the police who came out directly. They looked at the dog who was still stuck to the undercarriage of the truck and after much ado, decided it wasn’t a bomb and crawled under the truck and rescued this terrified little dog. My friend said he looked like he wasn’t starved and clung to him for security. They cut the tape to find the box was an old internet router box.

Where he came from, there is no way of knowing. Our best speculation is that kids took or found him and did this to him. He either got away or they just let him go. Either way, it was terrifying and traumatic for him. Poor baby… My friends assured me that they had posted several ads and called all of the shelters in the valley and after two weeks, the only missing schnauzer was a female. 

Dieter is a total sweetie with a few little issues we are working on. Since the first time he figured out he can use the dog door any time he wants, he is in and out all the time. I can’t recall the name they had given him, but Dieter is a good German name. He has been with us since late December 2012, and Asia, though more tolerant now, still treats him like a bad smell in the room. But we love him greatly and he will spend the rest of his life here with us.


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