Archive for Health & Nutrition

Dangers of Dry Food – Part 1 – Ingredients

Dangers of Dry Food - Part 1 - Ingredients - Savvy Pet Care
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As a cat parent and animal lover who wants the best for all pets, I am passionate about sharing the importance of a species appropriate diet. Dogs and cats are both carnivores and require high amounts of protein in their diets. Dogs can eat some vegetables and fruits in their diets but cats lack the enzyme required to properly digest and use carbohydrates.

I feed my cats raw but realize this is not practical for everyone. Even for me, this sometimes presents a challenge, so I am always looking for substitutes for my homemade raw food, meaning raw meat suppliers, packaged raw food and high-quality canned food for emergencies. I’ll let you know about these in the future.

I hope with this series on the Dangers of Dry Food I can at least convince you to stop feeding your cats dry food even if you don’t move all the way to raw. Although this article is aimed at cats, the ingredients information applies to dry dog food as well.

Rendered Ingredients

Take a look at the ingredients label on your favorite bag of dry food. Does it contain chicken meal, poultry byproduct meal, or meat and bone meal (MBM)? Chances are good that it contains at least one. Do you know what this means or how it becomes “meal?”

These meals are rendered ingredients that are made by first putting animal-source proteins through a large grinder to chunk them up. These chunks are boiled until they turn to mush. After the fat is skimmed off, the remainder is dried to a powder. These meals are used as a cheap source of animal protein.

Chicken meal is potentially the least contaminated as it is made in a plant that is usually associated with a slaughterhouse that processes only chickens. Chicken meal, according to the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), is the dry rendered product from a combination of clean chicken flesh and skin with or without accompanying bone, derived from whole carcasses of chicken, exclusive of feathers, heads, feet and entrails.

By definition, chicken by-product meal is made from grinding clean, rendered parts of chicken carcasses and can contain bones, offal and undeveloped eggs, but only contains feathers that are unavoidable in the processing of the poultry parts. FDA regulations for rendering plants are fairly loose, using phrases like “as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices.”

At the far end of the spectrum is MBM — meat and bone meal. The raw ingredients in this “dumping ground” may include:

  • non-meat parts of cattle, sheep, swine and poultry that are not suitable for human consumption (including diseased parts)
  • restaurant waste and out of date supermarket meat (including the packaging!)
  • animals that died on the farm, in zoos, roadkill, were euthenized, etc and may be decaying
  • animals too sick to walk into the slaughterhouse

Ann Martin, in her book Food Pets Die For: Shocking Facts About Pet Food says,The most objectionable source of protein for pet food is euthanized cats and dogs. It is a common practice for thousands of euthanized dogs and cats to be delivered to rendering plants, daily, and thrown into rendering vats–along with pet collars, I.D. tags, and plastic bags–to become part of an ingredient called ‘meat meal.’ If you see the term ‘meat meal’ listed as an ingredient, there is no guarantee that the pet food does not contain euthanized cats and dogs.” The drug used to euthanize animals does not degrade with rendering!

MBM is no longer allowed to be fed to cattle (ruminants). It is believed to be the cause of the spread of mad cow disease or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the 90s. Cattle can get the disease by eating less than one gram of diseased meat and bone meal fed to them as a protein source, yet this meal is allowed in our pet food in the US.

Most inexpensive dry foods contain poultry by-product meal or meat and bone meal. Even these are sometimes too expensive for manufacturers to make the necessary profit so they use vegetable proteins such as corn gluten meal, soybean meal, and plant protein concentrates to get the protein up to minimum acceptable levels.

Dangers of Dry Food - Part 1 - Ingredients - Savvy Pet Care
Dangers of Dry Food - Part 1 - Ingredients - Savvy Pet Care
Dangers of Dry Food - Part 1 - Ingredients - Savvy Pet Care
Dangers of Dry Food - Part 1 - Ingredients - Savvy Pet Care

Click on the photos to enlarge so you can read the ingredients.

Carbohydrates

A cat’s natural prey is about 9-10% carbohydrates, mostly from the liver and some from the undigested contents of the prey’s stomach. There is a wide range of carbohydrates in dry cat food, but they average about 30%. Often, when carbohydrate levels are lower, they have been replaced by fat rather than protein.

Carbohydrates in pet food come from grains or starchy vegetables. The simplest form of carbohydrates is sugar and all carbohydrates are a configuration of sugar. Carbohydrates equal calories.

Pet food manufacturers will tell you they add carbohydrates to food for energy. Cats use protein and fat for energy, and although they can digest and absorb carbohydrates, most of them are turned to fat and stored. Carbs do not satisfy a cat’s need for protein so they do not get the “signal” to stop eating. Dry food is a leading cause of obesity in cats.

The high carbohydrate levels cause spikes in blood sugar in the bloodstream. This continual stress on the metabolic system is a major contributor to feline diabetes.

Preservatives

Canned food is preserved by the act of canning and is sealed, but dry foods need preservatives (antioxidants) to ensure a long shelf life. Preservatives can be “natural” or synthetic. Commonly used natural antioxidants include tocopherols (vitamin E), ascorbic acid (vitamin C), citric acid, and rosemary. Synthetic preservatives include butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), propyl gallate, propylene glycol (also used as a less-toxic version of automotive antifreeze), and ethoxyquin.

There is a lot of controversy over the safety of synthetic preservatives. BHA and BHT have been suspected of being carcinogens and ethoxyquin has been associated with a myriad of medical problems in dogs. Further investigation is needed to determine the full health impact of these preservatives.

Keep in mind, if you purchase dry food with natural preservatives, they don’t have as long a shelf life as foods preserved with synthetics.

What it doesn’t contain – Moisture

Cats are engineered to derive their fluids from their prey. They don’t have a big thirst drive and, in fact, don’t usually start drinking water until they are about 3% dehydrated. This contributes to many serious health issues.

Choices

When you go to a pet store that carries a wide variety of pet food, the choices are almost overwhelming. If a cat only needs meat, do they really need a different formula for every breed or scenario, like hairball, indoor, etc? The answer, of course, is no. The truth is that the more formulas a brand has, the more shelf space it gets.

Dangers of Dry Food - Part 1 - Ingredients - Savvy Pet Care
Dangers of Dry Food - Part 1 - Ingredients - Savvy Pet Care

And, oh my, reading all those labels! My suggestion, obviously, is to stop feeding dry, then you won’t have to read them. I truly believe that the cheapest wet food is better than the most expensive dry food.

Have I convinced you of the dangers of dry food and to stop feeding dry food to your cats?

If this post hasn’t convinced you to stop feeding dry, come back for future posts on the Dangers of Dry Food. In the meantime, if you must feed dry, please be sure your dry food meets these minimum standards:

  • Uses named meat protein sources such as chicken, turkey, lamb, beef — not vague descriptions like poultry or meat
  • Contains no by-products
  • Contains no fillers such as corn, wheat or soy
  • Contains no artificial ingredients or preservatives

Protein is the most expensive ingredient in dry food and carbohydrates are the cheapest, but don’t let the price of your food fool you. A higher price does not guarantee better quality. Check the ingredients.

Be sure your cat has access to fresh water at all times.

Further reading:


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Raw Diet for Cats: How a raw diet can affect behavior

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I haven’t been able to make raw food for several months and I have been paying the price. All kitties in the household acted like they were starving to death at meal times, no matter how much I fed them. Two, including Christy, got raging diarrhea (again!). The diarrhea continued for both, even on grain-free food.

Finally, a couple of days ago, I made a batch. Everyone but Echo was quite excited by the idea. I had a very difficult time transitioning Echo to raw food in the beginning and it looks like Mr. Picky is going to try me again. All the other kitties, however, snarfed it down without hesitation. I could see them thinking, “It’s about time!”

Feeding a Raw Diet can affect Behavior

The most interesting thing to me is the change in their behavior. As I mentioned,Patiently waiting - how a raw diet can affect behavior they were acting like they were starving to death. They would mill around while I was getting their food ready, meowing and fussing with one another. My most Siamesey mix was driving me crazy with her yowling. Even before meal time, she would go to the area where she is fed and start up. Oh my gosh, please shut up! After only two days back on raw food, they patiently wait while I get their food ready then they race to their designated area to eat. No more meowing, yowling or fussing.

I had one cat that had taken to living in a bedroom upstairs, except at meal time, because she would get chased as soon as meal time was over. No more. She is now back down stairs and content. No one seems to feel the need to chase her.

I am actually feeding them less raw food than they were getting of commercially canned food. They get about two ounces twice a day of raw versus the three ounces twice a day of commercial. Their appetites are more easily satisfied with higher quality protein with no grain or vegetables as filler. 

Benefits of a raw diet

  • Improved digestion
  • Greatly reduced stool odor and volume
  • Healthy coat, less shedding, fewer hairballs
  • Increased energy
  • Weight loss is easily achieved if overweight
  • Better dental health
  • Better urinary health

A raw diet has so many benefits but this change in behavior is one of the most welcome. Oh, and the diarrhea has already cleared up.


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Buyer Beware

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About three years ago, MeoowzResQ was turned onto a discount pet medication website by another rescue. I do some of the buying for MeoowzResQ so I was asked to research this potential opportunity. Vaccination Services (their website is fleastuff.com) has a membership program and once you pay a reasonable fee, you receive a 20% additional discount on the already discounted products they sell. Sounds pretty good, right? Well, as they say, let the buyer beware.

When I first contacted this company, our main interest was for Advantage II. Their representative explained to me that Advantage and Advantage II are the same–they just updated their packaging. Trusting that the “expert” new what he was talking about, I let him sell me Advantage.

Over the next two years, we kept getting complaints from fosters that they buyer beware - all flea treatments are not the samecouldn’t get rid of fleas. I kept telling them that if they were using the Advantage as directed and vacuuming regularly, this should not be happening.

When we kept getting complaints, I started doing some research. I discovered that Advantage and Advantage II are NOT the same. Advantage II contains a growth regulator that plain Advantage does not have. This keeps hatching eggs from growing into adult fleas thus breaking the life cycle.

So, several months ago, when I placed our order, I very specifically ordered Advantage II and said, “Do not send us regular Advantage,” and have reminded them of that with every order. I had had a flea infestation and certainly did not want to have another!

Well, about three months ago, I started seeing the telltale signs. My cats were scratching. They started running across the carpet and eventually refused to be on the carpet. They would move across rooms on the furniture. They preferred to lay on the kitchen floor or other hard surfaces like the kitchen counters. Ugh!

I had been using the regular Advantage that we had been getting in the past so I went to the rescue to get some of the new Advantage II they had been getting. When I was handed a tube, it said “Advantage” on it, not Advantage II. The only ingredient listed was the pesticide. I figured this must have been an old tube but was suspicious. It was time to reorder so I asked them to keep all the packaging when the new order arrived. 

When the order arrived, I was shocked! Twelve tubes of Advantage were packaged in an Advantage II box for six tubes with a sticker placed on it that said 12 tubes. The tubes said Advantage, with the single ingredient, while the box said Advantage II with the two ingredients. 

Of course, I called the company. The gentleman again began to try to tell me they are the same. When I confronted him on the ingredients, he said, “Return it to me and I’ll give you a full refund.” When I wanted it replaced with Advantage II, he finally admitted that they don’t actually have Advantage II, only what they shipped.

So, I have been fighting another flea infestation! At least this one is fairly mild compared to the last one as I recognized the signs early. I still have not actually seen any fleas in the carpet, etc., only on the cats. During my last infestation, they were jumping all over the place, including on me!

Needless to say, we have found another, reliable source for our Advantage II. Here is an article about some other online scams to avoid: 

Seven Dog Scams to Avoid Online


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Save Money Treating Fleas with Revolution

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save money treating fleas with RevolutionIn our last post I told you how to save money on flea treatment by splitting large tubes of Advantage, made by Bayer, and Frontline, made by Merial. You can do the same thing and save money treating fleas with Revolution but there are a couple of differences. 

Advantage and Frontline are regulated by the EPA and are now available over the counter. Revolution, made by Zoetis, still requires a prescription and is regulated by the FDA rather than the EPA.

Although it is a little more expensive than Advantage and Frontline, Revolution helps protect your pet against a wider variety of parasites. The active ingredient in Revolution is selamectin. It works by penetrating the skin and entering your pet’s bloodstream. Concentrations of selamectin in the tissue and bloodstream prevent heartworm disease. Selamectin also redistributes into the skin from the bloodstream and kills adult fleas, American dog ticks, and ear mites, and prevents flea eggs from hatching. It is also an anthelmintic, which means it fights to expel parasitic worms. Parasites ingest the drug when they feed on the animal’s blood. Revolution is safe for pregnant and lactating pets. Revolution doesn’t have a growth regulator in it but the active ingredient in it does prevent flea eggs from hatching.

The thing I really like about Revolution is that it is quick-drying and non-greasy. If you are splitting tubes, it is imperative that you leave it in the tube it comes in and draw it from the tube with a needle as described in our previous post. The ingredient that makes it quick-drying also makes it very volatile. Once out of the tube and in a larger container, it can totally evaporate! Make sure the tube is tightly capped. I have read that it is advisable to store it in the refrigerator once opened.

The largest packet of Revolution is PLUM colored (for Extra Large Dogs) and is labeled for dogs 85.1 – 130 lbs. The volume of each dose of topical solution is 3 mL and the concentration of the drug is 120 mg/ml. THUS, each dose of PLUM Revolution for Extra Large Dogs (360 mg) can treat 24 kittens or 8 cats!

Revolution dosage chart

Please note: Veterinarians and drug manufacturers warn against tube splitting and doing so may void their liability. Some dog-only products, such as Advantix, can kill a cat. Do your own research and if you decide to split tubes be sure to:

  • Handle safely – wash your hands thoroughly after use
  • Store properly – in a cool, dark place
  • Use the appropriate dose

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Save Money on Flea Treatment

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save money on flea treatmentDid you know you can save money on flea treatment for your cats and small dogs by purchasing the largest size package of Advantage II (Extra Large Dog – over 55 lbs.) or Frontline Plus (89-132 lbs.) for dogs and using a portion of a tube at a time? You can also use plain Advantage and Frontline the same way but these products do not contain the second ingredient that the II and Plus versions have which is a growth regulator and I cannot stress how important this is in avoiding a flea infestation.

The plain versions of these products kill adult fleas but do not stop the eggs that fall to the floor or furniture from hatching and becoming adult, biting fleas. Yes, once back on your pet the adults die, but that doesn’t stop the cycle and an adult flea can lay up to 50 eggs per day! That’s where the growth regulator comes in. It interferes with the normal growth cycle of the fleas and prevents them from becoming mature adults.

The drugs in Advantage II for Dogs and Advantage II for Cats are exactly the same drugs (Imidacloprid 9.1% and Pyriproxyfen 0.46%) at the exact same concentrations. 

Advantage II Application Guidelines:
Cats up to 9 pounds – 0.4ml

Cats 10+ pounds – 0.8ml
Dogs 11-20 pounds – 1.0ml
Dogs 21-55 pounds – 2.5ml
Dogs 55+ pounds – 4.0ml

Frontline Plus for cats contains 9.8% fipronil and 11.8% (S)-methoprene (and 78.4% inert ingredients). Frontline Plus for dogs contains 9.8% fipronil and 8.8% (S)-methoprene (and 81.4% inert ingredients). The amount of growth regulator in the dog version is LESS than in the cat version so certainly should be safe for your cat. Don’t use the cat version on your dog.

Frontline Application Guidelines:
Cats 0.5ml

Dogs 11-22 pounds – 0.67ml
Dogs 23-44 pounds – 1.34ml
Dogs 45-88 pounds – 2.68ml
Dogs 89-132 pounds – 4.0ml

Here’s How to Save Money on Flea TreatmentSave money on flea treatment. What to use and how much. Photo of bottle, syringe and flea medication.

Using the dog versions of Advantage and Frontline on cats is nothing new. You will find uninformed people on the internet saying don’t do it, but shelters and rescues have been doing it for years. That doesn’t in and of itself make it right, but it is vet approved, including by my vet.

I have found the easiest way to portion out the product if you are treating multiple animals is to empty a tube into a small (1/2 oz.) bottle with a dropper tip. You can cut off the tip to accommodate a syringe and draw up the proper amount. I prefer to draw it out this way rather than wasting what sticks to the outside of the syringe if you just stick it down into the bottle. You can then just squeeze out the syringe onto your pet. I highly recommend using a syringe for accurate measurement–this is not something you want to eyeball!

A second method, especially if you are treating only one or two pets, is to use a syringe with a needle and draw what you need directly from the tube. Remove the needle and apply to your pet.

Please note: The above information is for Advantage and Frontline only. Veterinarians and drug manufacturers warn against tube splitting and doing so may void their liability. Some dog-only products, such as Advantix, can kill a cat. Do your own research and if you decide to split tubes be sure to:

  • Handle safely – wash your hands thoroughly after use
  • Store properly – in a cool, dark place
  • Use the appropriate dose

Advantage II Extra Large Dog 6-Pack (Misc.)


List Price: $79.27 USD
New From: $61.30 USD In Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

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What Causes Obesity in Cats?

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obesity in cats2011 study by APOP (Association for Pet Obesity Prevention) shows that obesity in cats is on the rise. The study found that over 50 percent of cats were either obese or overweight. As with humans, obesity in cats can be detrimental to their health. It can predispose them to diabetes, fatty liver disease and arthritis. The cause is too many calories taken in compared to the calories expended. Sound familiar?

The main reason for feline obesity is “free feeding” of dry food. This is a pretty unnatural way to eat for a true carnivore that evolved as a hunting machine! Some cats will self-regulate their intake but many won’t.

Cats, unlike most mammals, have no carbohydrate-digesting enzyme called amylase in their saliva. Humans and dogs do and actually begin the digestion of carbohydrate in the mouth. In the intestine, amylase secreted from the pancreas breaks down large carbohydrate molecules into absorbable smaller units of glucose. Cats have measurably less amylase activity than humans or dogs. Nature did not intend the kitty to be a carbohydrate consumer.

Dry food is not a healthy diet for any cat. Dry pet food must have higher levels of flour and sugar than canned foods so that the kibble will stay uniform and not fall apart. Spoiling doesn’t readily occur because of the preservatives so the kitty can eat whenever it wants and we don’t have to prepare cat meals very often. Dry food is also a water-depleted (about 10%) diet that can lead to urinary tract problems. Cats do not have a strong water drive and are used to getting much of their water from their food. Their natural prey is about 70% water. So, why do we feed dry food? Because it is cheap and convenient. But consider this, feeding the least expensive canned food is far better than feeding the most expensive dry food.

So what should a cat eat? Cats need a diet high in protein, with moderate fat and a low percentage of carbohydrates. A mouse or bird is only about 3-8% carbohydrate. Cats should be fed 2-4 small meals a day and only about 1 ounce per meal for a seven pound cat. The higher in protein the meal is, the less it will take to satisfy your cat. Check out our post on making raw food.

If your cat is not overweight, you should be able to easily feel the ribs with just a slight fat pad over them. Cats should also have a waist when viewed from above. They should not have any fat pads over their shoulders and if you pick up their skin, you should not feel thick fat underneath. Their top line (backbone and back of the head) should be well-muscled and not terribly prominent (too thin) or hard to feel (too fat).

As your cat’s caretaker, you are completely in control of what he eats. If your cat is overweight, you need to approach a weight loss plan very carefully as weight loss needs to be gradual. Cats have a unique metabolic response to fasting and whenever a feline’s food intake is rapidly and markedly depressed, a serious and potentially fatal disorder can occur called Hepatic Lipidosis (fatty liver disease). You should consult with your veterinarian before starting a weight loss plan.


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Pet Health Awareness

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Pet Health Awareness Month


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National Preparedness Month

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Are you prepared for an emergency? In a Citizen Corps National Survey taken in September is National Preparedness Month2009, less than 50% of Americans surveyed reported having a household emergency plan. This month is the 10th annual National Preparedness Month, sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the US Department of Homeland Security. September was chosen as National Preparedness Month, as the tragedies of September 11th, 2001 highlighted to the nation the importance of being prepared.

Disaster can strike at any time without warning but you can take simple steps to prepare for emergencies in your home. FEMA has identified four major steps to being prepared:

  1. Be informed
  2. Make a plan
  3. Build a kit
  4. Get involved

Building a Kit

Remember Your Pets in Your Plan

Make a plan that includes your pets during National Preparedness MonthWhen you are making your plan and building your kit, remember to include your pets. Leaving them behind in a disaster puts them and others at risk. 

Having proper identification on your pet is important every day but essential in a disaster. You may have a carrier to take pets to the vet or groomer but do you have one for each pet? Be sure each crate has identification on it. Familiarize your pets with the crates before they are needed. Know where you will go when you evacuate. Pets may not be allowed in human shelters so know where pet friendly hotels are or make arrangements to stay with a friend or relative outside of the disaster area.

Disaster Supplies for Pets

  • Food (in airtight waterproof containers or cans) and water for at Cats in cratesleast 2 weeks for each pet
  • Food and water bowls and a manual can opener
  • For cats: litter box and litter
  • For dogs: plastic bags for poop
  • Clean-up items for bathroom accidents (paper towels, plastic trash bags, bleach-containing cleaning agent)
  • Medications for at least 2 weeks, along with any treats used to give the medications and pharmacy contact for refills
  • Medical records
    • Rabies vaccination certificate
    • Current vaccination record
    • If your pet has a microchip, a record of the microchip number
    • Prescription for medication(s)
    • For cats, most recent FeLV/FIV test result or vaccination date
    • Summary of pertinent medical history; ask your veterinarian for a copy
  • Sturdy leashes or harnesses
  • Carrier or cage that is large enough for your pet to stand comfortably and turn around; towels or blankets
  • Pet toys and bed (familiar items to help the pet[s] feel more comfortable).
  • A handout containing identification Adobe PDF file information (in the event you get separated from your pet)
    • Current photo of pet
    • Pet’s descriptive features (age, sex, neutered/non-neutered status, color(s), and approximate weight)
    • Microchip number
    • Owner contact information (cell phone, work phone, home phone)
    • Contact information of a close relative or friend,
  • A handout with boarding instructions, Adobe PDF file such as feeding schedule, medications, and any known allergies and behavior problems
  • Documents, medications, and food should be stored in waterproof containers

More Information for Pet Owners


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Odd-eyed Cats

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What exactly is an odd-eyed cat? An odd-eyed, or bi-eyed, cat is a cat with one blue eye and one of another color, either green, yellow or brown. This is a feline form of complete heterochromia. This condition most commonly occurs in white cats but can occur in other cats that carry the white spotting gene – the gene that makes bi-color and tuxedo cats. It rarely occurs in cats without the white or white spotting gene.

Three gorgeous, odd-eyed kittens

Three gorgeous, odd-eyed kittens

All kittens are born with blue eyes. Normally, melanin (the same stuff that turns our skin brown when we get a suntan) moves into the iris and the eyes begin to change color. By about seven to twelve weeks, the kitten’s eyes have turned the color they will remain, although additional changes can occur for several months. If no melanin moves in, the eyes stay blue.

It is a common misconception that all white cats with blue eyes are deaf. Only some white cats suffer from congenital deafness caused by a degeneration of the inner ear. This condition is associated with blue irises. In white cats with mixed-coloured eyes (odd-eyed cats), it has been found that deafness is more likely to affect the ear on the blue-eyed side.

Odd-eyed Cats in Turkey

Some cat breeds are more likely than others to have odd eyes such as the Turkish angora, Turkish van, and Japanese bobtail, although any cat with the white or white spotting gene can develop them. Complete heterochromia is rare, and because of this, Turkish angora cats with blue and amber eyes are considered a national treasure in Turkey. In 1817, the government of Turkey, in conjunction with the Ankara Zoo, began a meticulous breeding program to preserve and protect pure white Turkish angora cats with blue and amber eyes, a program that continues today. Turkish folklore suggests that “the eyes must be as green as the lake and as blue as the sky.”

A MeoowzResQ Facebook follower relates that “when my family lived in Ankara, Turkey years ago (in the late 70’s) we noticed that there were tons of feral cats wandering around the city. One of my dad’s Turkish coworkers told him that according to local lore, Mustafa Kemal Attaturk (who led the people to rebel against the autocratic Ottoman Empire, founded the Democratic Republic in 1923 and was its first president) was supposedly going to come back, reincarnated as a cat – specifically a pure white Angora cat with the dual toned eyes (“Van Kedisi” in Turkish). Others believed that Attaturk’s successor would be identified by a bite on the ankle from one of these cats. As a result, it was thought to be bad luck (bad form, bad karma, bad what-have-you) to put any stray cat to sleep just in case, but these pure white cats are widely sought after and immensely pampered. The word Angora comes from a derivation of the name Ankara, the capital city where Attaturk established the Democratic Republic, and where many of these cats originate.”

http://www.knowyourcat.info/info/heterochromia.htm

http://www.petsadviser.com/pet-health/cats-with-two-different-colored-eyes/


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Raw Food Means Their Favorite Treat!

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Somehow, my cats always know when I’m making raw food for them. Before the chicken ever comes out, while I’m gathering my utensils, they all start to assemble in the kitchen. No, it is not what they always do when I go to the kitchen. They know that at other times they don’t get anything, so they don’t bother. I guess they recognize the routine.

Gathering for their favorite treat -- raw chicken

Gathering for their favorite treat — raw chicken

They all politely, if not patiently, wait for their turn at a delicious morsel of chicken. I couldn’t get any good photos because they were not interested in holding still for a pose. 

Christy taking raw chicken

Open wide - making raw food

Christy Paws loves her raw chicken!

Jan has had all her teeth removed due to stomatis but still manages to eat raw food

Jan has had all her teeth removed due to stomatis but still manages

Fontana always has to make a face first

Fontana always has to make a face first


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